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Interactive whiteboard seminar


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#31 Roy Huggins

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 07:14 PM

Good idea Neil! I think Andrew meantioned something similar a while ago. What we need is a collection of graphic organisers and frames that people can download and use on their IWB in jpg format so that they can imported into any IWB software. However, I must agree that SmartNotes is the best. RM's Easyteach is not easy!

Many of my graphic organisers are designed to be used along side accelerated learning techniques. Any one interested?

kind Regards

Roy

Edited by rhuggins, 20 December 2005 - 07:16 PM.

"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus

#32 Andrew Field

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 09:06 PM

I think one area that could be developed is the ability to share the IWB resources - the power of School History is that we can download a worksheet or PowerPoint but, what about SMARTNOTES etc?


If there is a free tool that people can download so they can use them, I'm happy to create a section that has downloadable SMARTNOTES too.

I do feel that a major issue is copyright though - it is vital that any freely downloadable material is copyright free. I've got 100s of PowerPoints that I use in school but I simply cannot upload because of copyright concerns. As long as that is taken care of, I've got no problem supporting such a development.

I do think the area that Roy is suggesting is very interesting though - offering teacher created templates for download would be very straightforward. Materials could be put through Flash to turn the resources into vector images, meaning they can be resized. Not ideal for things like images, but ideal for maps, charts, diagrams etc.


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#33 Simon Ross

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 12:17 PM

Would really second what Andrew said there. I long to share the resources (and steal other people's) but I'm too worried about all the copyright issues.

Really enjoyed reading everyone's posts. I have had a go at summarising my views, with a few examples, at http://www.ilovehist...uk/iwb/iwb.html

Merry Christmas,

Simon

Edited to activate the hyperlink by adding http:// to the start

Edited by Andrew Field, 22 December 2005 - 04:05 AM.


#34 ojsaunders

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 12:30 AM

Never posted before but I'm so inspired by this site I wanted to........
I also went to a course by Roy on iwb and found it really got me going with the whiteboard. One idea that I've used very successfully is to have a series of events on the board in the wrong order and mixed up. Students come up to sort out the order. Very good for chronology but mostly just to get them to work what happened in what order.
If you put resources up please do it not just in smartnotes - I use promethean which does just what smartnotes does - Ive used both - neither one seems to be any better than the other!!!

Thanks to you all.
Oliver :biggrin_xmas:

#35 Roy Huggins

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 10:26 PM

HI Oliver,

I take your main point, but the beauty of the Smart Notes license is that if your school owns one Smartboard then it automatically gets a site license which means that everyone can use the software legally within the school.

So why is this important? With all the ICT resources coming into schools from various different funding streams, its no unusal to have two oe even three different types of IWB in some departments. If everyone uses the same IWB software it makes it easier to share good practice, resources and deliver inset within the department. If everyone is using different software its a nighmare when things go wrong ....

So I suppose the moral of the story is that it doesn't matter which IWB software you use so long as you get everyone in the department to use the same one purely from a practical point of view.

Once you have callabrated or orientated your board with the manufacturers software, you can use Smart Notes on any IWN just like you would PowerPoint or Word. I don't think the same is true of the promethean software. I could be wrong?

Another example that came to mind is that if you have to move about the school it makes sense using the same software instead of having to use a different one each time. It woudl make your preparation a nightmare! jus

Kind Regards

Roy :jester:
"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus

#36 Andrew Field

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 11:17 PM

From my experience Roy you can use any software on any interactive whiteboard. This is because the whiteboard is essentially an input device (it tracks where the user touches it) and a display device (it shows the computer display). The software that is used runs on the connected PC - so it doesn't really care which whiteboard is connected.

There are obvious issues though - the Promethian software is written with a Promethian board in mind and thus reacts specifically to the use of the pen. SmartNotes reacts to the Smart hardware and thus doesn't work as well unless you've got the four pens and board rubber etc.

... and these are the only two types. There are at least ten different types of whiteboard. What you'll also find is that departments often have little control over what is actually purchased. They'll reqest an interactive whiteboard but then the ICT resources people, or simply the finance people, will find the most cost effective solution. When this happens the school will end up using a whole variety of interactive whiteboards causing headaches both in terms of technical support and in staff training.

In reality the best solution is to adapt resources to fit with the hardware and software that you have available to you, but it would be best, if possible, to use standard software that is available to everyone. Thus if there is a SMART viewer or suchlike, akin to the free PowerPoint viewer - or if there is a free alternative (like OpenOffice) it would be far more practical.

The two leaders in whiteboard software - SMART and Promethian seem to play 'catch-up' with their own software.

Smart seem to allow a download of their software from:
http://www.smarttech...pport/software/ but I guess this would be unlicenced.

I would be very happy to explore adding a section to the main SchoolHistory.co.uk site that offered downloads of materials. We'd obviously need to be clear about copyright and look carefully into which formats to use.

In some ways, I see the whiteboard software as actually best used on top of an existing resource. Thus you prepare your presentation in PowerPoint and then use the functionality of the whiteboard software to disguise the screen or adapt it accordingly. As I develop more Flash-based learning activities I see further opportunities to use whiteboard software in this way.

Edit: When I suggested having a collection of reusable materials for history - vector images that could be rescaled etc. etc. this is the kind of thing I was suggesting:
http://www.smarttech...ipart/index.asp. I'm not exactly sure, but I'd be interested in exploring how things like my Interactive Diagrams could be made more whiteboard friendly, perhaps with a 'zoom' function or something.

Edited by Andrew Field, 29 December 2005 - 11:23 PM.



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#37 A Finemess

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Posted 30 December 2005 - 11:20 AM

Lots of good ideas here but as we all know, the best way to learn something is to see someone do it and then try it for oneself. However, it's also difficult to arrange demo's from subject specialists because of course, we spend nearly all our time delivering lessons and the rest of the time preparing them so it's difficult to arrange time away to deliver training to one's colleagues.

Which brings me to my interest in things two wheeled. (Bear with me here!) A guy in the states who rides the same machine as myself set up a digital movie camera in his garage / workshop and made a record of a clutch replacement job he was doing. He then turned this into a DVD which he made available to other enthusiasts - at a cost of course.

So how about someone doing the same for whiteboard use in History?
“All men dream; but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act out otheir dreams with open eyes, to make it possible.”.(T.E. Lawrence)
<img src="http://www.cyberium....lawrence-1.jpg" border="0" class="linked-sig-image" /> Who said bikers can't be pretentious?

#38 sarahthompson

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 09:56 AM

I was just reading this thread; what is a thinking skills review triangle? sounds interesting. thanks :)

#39 DAJ Belshaw

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 04:28 PM

I was just reading this thread; what is a thinking skills review triangle? sounds interesting. thanks :)

I think I'm correct in saying it's a triangle with:
  • one section at the top ('one thing I already knew')
  • two sections in the middle ('two questions I have about what we learned / two things I didn't understand')
  • three sections at the bottom ('three things I learned today')
Roy included a picture which he puts up on his interactive whiteboard with a load of resources he gave. I've put that picture on the shareforum here.

Doug :hehe:

#40 Roy Huggins

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 07:03 PM

Hi Andy,

The SmartNotes will work with any board. All you have to do is click on the pen icon at the top and you can use any IWB Pen.

Roy

There are obvious issues though - the Promethian software is written with a Promethian board in mind and thus reacts specifically to the use of the pen. SmartNotes reacts to the Smart hardware and thus doesn't work as well unless you've got the four pens and board rubber etc.




Hi Doug,

There are several thinking skills triangles. The one that you described is the KWL version - Know - Want to Know and Learnt.

The basic thinking skills triangle is your basic hierachy triangle with 5 sections that you can organise and drag and drop information into.

It would be nice if we could unload some graphic organisers for IWBs onto schoolhistory.co.uk. They are basically pictures that can be written on or imported into PP or SmartNotes?

Roy
"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus

#41 DAJ Belshaw

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 09:43 PM

It would be nice if we could unload some graphic organisers for IWBs onto schoolhistory.co.uk. They are basically pictures that can be written on or imported into PP or SmartNotes?

Roy

Roy, you (and anyone else for that matter) can add resources to the shareforum for other History teachers to download. Hopefully those on the forum will share what they've got in order to get stuff in return! :teacher:

Doug :hehe:

#42 Roy Huggins

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 05:50 PM

The following Seminar on IWBs was delivered at IST in Toulouse 2006 by Roy Huggins

One of the questions posed by several delegates at the E-Help Conference in Toulouse is what is the role of ICT in the classroom? The main thrust of my seminar was that teachers need to move away from seeing IWBs and ICT as a teaching or presentation tool to using it as learning tool to engage learners through interactive teaching styles.

Variety is the spice of life and every good teacher knows that you have to use a range of teaching and learning styles that appeal to the different learning strengths of your class. Interactive Whiteboards are an excellent medium for appealing to the visual, kinaesthetic and auditory learners to create memorable lessons that stick in their minds.

One of the first ideas that I showcased at the E-Help Conference was a simple snowballing starter exercise where the teacher uses the IWB to display the key words for the lessons. I asked the delegates to study the key words for two minutes and then use the curtain feature of SmartNotes to cover up the words. They then had to write down as many words as they could remember in two minutes. Once the time was up I then asked them to share their answers with their neighbour and try and add to their list of key words. This is a really nice warm up exercise to get a class discussing and sharing answers. I then again used the curtain feature to reveal the key words and ask them to either self assess or peer assess their answers - a nice opportunity for AFL!

This sort of activity appeals to the visual and auditory learner, but can then be extended by Kinaesthetic learners by asking them to either link the key words or classify them depending upon the topic. I often use similar activities using the spot light tool on a series of hidden pictures and then ask students or groups of students to try and identify the historical character or a historical artefact.

A picture can paint a thousand words and I often use a variety of images on my IWB and ask students to go for 5 bullet points in the back of their books and then during the feedback session to get out of their chairs and annotate on the board. At this stage of my seminar I was able to showcase how you could get a class of students all out of their places in rotation to annotate a diagram with historical inaccuracies to illustrate the simplicity of this idea.

You may be thinking at this stage that none of this is rocket science, but the beauty of these types of starters is that they make very effective low maintence starters and plenaries that help to hook and engage students. ICT does not need to be clever and sophisticated in order to get students enjoying what they are doing. However, as we all know from our own experiences if you over use PowePoints, Drag and Drop or even textbooks and worksheets, they can soon lose their appeal. Variety is critical to a successful lesson.

Once I had completed this stage of my seminar, I then moved onto how to use IWB to develop critical historical thinking skills and accelerated learning styles through the use of graphic organizers.

Visual thinking can be expressed in many ways. Graphic organizers are one way for visual thinkers to arrange their ideas. There are unlimited ways to express these visual ideas. Graphic organizers have many names including visual maps, mind mapping, brainstorms (idea showers) and visual organizers, or whatever other name you wish to give them...but graphic organizers are basically visual ways to represent information. I have a number of different organisers, which I annotate as simple diagrams or for more complex drag and drop activities in SmartNotes.

There are literally dozens upon dozens of versions of graphic organizers; there are almost as many books, manuals, and guides, not to mention websites that can give you a whole range of examples. For our purposes I use thinking skill triangles, venn diagrams, chain of events, simple KWL tables, reliability squares, pie charts and many others including zones of tolerance.

How Do They Work?

Since you know that some of your students are visual learners, and that a picture is worth a thousand words, then you should have in your toolbox some ways to organize ideas, facts, and concepts graphically.

Using boxes, circles, ovals, rectangles, and other shapes, not to mention lines for connecting, students can show information according to its level (main ideas, subtopics, details or elaboration, and so on). They can show how two ideas compare to one another (as in a Venn Diagram) or comparison alley. They can trace the order, sequence, or stages of a process in a cause and consequence diagram. They can be used to show how characters in a historical situation or story work with and relate to one another.

Graphic organizers can be used in all phases of learning from brainstorming ideas as a starter, to presenting findings in a plenary. They can be used individually, or in large groups. For example, some teachers like to create a class concept map as a large group to review at the end of a unit or develop a cause & consequence map while introducing a topic to a whole class. These tools are particularly useful in activities that require critical thinking skills such as source analysis.

My preferred style is to have students working on their own or in groups completing their graphic organisers and then feedback either in a class discussion or kinaesthetically on the whiteboard. The key is to question their choices and get them to explain the reasons behind their arguments or classification on the IWB in order to encourage the auditory learner and develop those critical thinking skills.

Through this phase of my seminar I demonstrated a range of drag and drop activities using graphic organisers as well as a number of downloaded flash files that I had captured from www.schoolhistory.co.uk. Unfortunately, half way through this demonstration my file corrupted and I was unable to recover it, demonstrating that you should always have a plan B when using any form of ICT in the classroom!

Amway, after a massive heart attack, I then moved on to showcase how you can use SmartNotes on an IWB to do literacy-modelling exercises with students. Normally after a snowballing session I will move on and read a passage from a textbook or worksheet on a topic like the causes of the First World War. I will then get my students to classify a series of statements into a thinking skills triangle on the IWB, which they will use either later in the lesson or for homework to produce an extended answer. Once they have drafted and written their answers I will scan a selection of class work and get them to peer assess and annotate the answers with the pens on the IWB to highlight effective use of persuasive language, analysis, good use of language, key words, historical facts and even where they would insert additional punctuation and full stops. Once this phase of the AFL exercise is over is over I will then sit down and then begin typing a answer into Smart Notes asking the students to provide the ideas and phrases I will need to construct a model answer. This is highly effective use of ICT on an IWB and is great for developing the literacy and critical thinking skills of students.

For those of you who are wondering what Smart Notes is, it’s a software package that normally bundled with a Smart board. However, you can use this software with any IWB so long as you delete the start-up file from your program files. We have three different IWBs in our department so it makes sense for us all to use the same software package to that it is easier to share resources and ideas. You can download this software from www. And you can also use it on a tablet pc, which can be passed around the classroom,


For my plenary, I then moved onto how to use content generators like Gameshow Presenter to inject a bit of fun, pace, teamwork and good old-fashioned Kinaesthetic learning into the lesson for my plenary. For those of you who have not come across Gameshow Presenter it is a brilliant software package that can be downloaded from www.gameshowpresenter.com. I demonstrated to the delegates how the package could be easily customised to create a really cheesy plenary or starter. In some respects, it is very similar to packages like Fling the Teacher or Penalty Shoot out. The key difference is that the kids love the insults, jibes and over the top praise and congratulations when they get the their answers either right or wrong. The same was also true for the delegates and even John Simpkin appear to enjoy himself and cried foul at one stage!

To conclude, IWB are a great medium for developing interactive teaching styles through the use of graphic organisers, video clips, pictures, snowballing, drag and drop and fun games like gameshow presenter, but if you over use any medium for too long it can lose its impact. One of the mistakes that I made at my school whilst I was the e-learning coordinator was to train everyone how to use GameShow Presenter. Within a couple of weeks of being over exposed, the kids quickly grew bored. ICT is more than a presentational tool and however you engage your students; variety is the spice of life if you want to create high impact memorable lessons. IWB`s are a brilliant medium and if you haven't got one get one, but don't just use it to present ideas, get the kids out of their seats and have some fun!

If you are interested in attending a similar seminar I will be delivering two seminars on IWBs at the SHP Conference in Leeds in July. I've also just agreed to do two more day long seminars on developing interactive teaching styles using ICT for a company called Lighthouse Professional Development in the Autumn term 2006. Folks are always welcome to drop in at Mexborough School during the holidays or after school, by arrangement to swap ideas, resources and have some free hands on training. Why reinvent the wheel?

Kind Regards

Roy

Edited by rhuggins, 17 June 2006 - 09:37 AM.

"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus

#43 Roy Huggins

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 12:56 PM

:jester: Hi Guys,

In order to help folks along with their IWBs I've produced a PP presentation with all the graphic organisers that I've meantioned in the above threads as well as examples of how they can be used.

I also have some interesting software that I've picked up from various places like a flash blockbusters generator which is very useful on an IWB for creating low maintaince starters and plenaries.

Anyway, if you are going to the SHP conference this year June 2006, I'm taking my external hard drive along with me so that I can share resources. If you have just popped into this seminar from the SHP conference then remember that I will happily swap resources with people.

Firstly, click on my name and send me a message detailiing which topics you teach. I'll then estimate how many DVD-R disks I'll need. I'll then e-mail you back with my address so that you can send the disks, a stamped addressed envelope and any resources that you would like to share.

I will start copying resources for people during the summer holidays. However, I only share resources with people who are also prepared to share both theirs and the resources with other history teachers. Why reinvent the wheel!

Lets together, through schoolhistory.co.uk, work to help transform the teaching of history through a revolution from below! If thats a little bit too radical for you, start with your resources with your own department!

Kind Regards

Roy

Edited by rhuggins, 02 July 2006 - 04:30 PM.

"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus

#44 Roy Huggins

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Posted 09 July 2006 - 06:29 PM

Hi there,

Many thanks to all those who attended my seminars and shared resources at SHP conference.

Looking forward to answering any questions people might have. Please don't shy and start posting!

Roy
"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus

#45 MickCutler

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Posted 09 July 2006 - 06:40 PM

Hi Roy
I just wanted to say how much I enjoyed your seminar on Saturday morning. Even though I was a 'nought' on your scale, it was good to see an IWB in action and start to get some ideas for how it could be used. Unfortunately I do not as yet have any resources to share with you, but come September when I have a department full of the things (and 2 enthusiastic NQTs!) I am sure I will be able to swap some bits and pieces with you. I'm sure I will also come back to this thread a few times for answers to questions...
Thanks again for your time (and the dingbats handouts!)

Mick
Every time I open my mouth, some damn fool speaks!




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