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Lesson Objectives


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#1 Maggie Smith

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 02:43 PM

I am looking for a more interesting way of setting lesson objectives and wondered if anyone could suggest an unusual/ motivating (for students and me) way of doing this

Imaginative and thinking caps on

Thanks

#2 Stewart Hogg

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 08:04 PM

One thing I've done in the past is to use a points system whereby the first perosn to get the LO down gets 5 points.

Over the course of a half term then get a prize - chocolates etc.

It means that the kids make an effort to get to lessons on time and get the LO's into books.

Is that helpful ?

#3 Maggie Smith

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 11:58 AM

Nice idea, but.............

we have a high number of SEN and dyslexic students who would take forever to note down objective :( :wacko: - could be printed off though

I want to 'grab' them with the objectives, rather than do what every other teacher at school does

We are also a 'healthy school, so the sweet idea is , sadly!!

I am looking for way of setting them that adds a bit of mystery and excitment - :o :o

#4 Stewart Hogg

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 12:07 PM

Nice idea, but.............

we have a high number of SEN and dyslexic students who would take forever to note down objective :( :wacko: - could be printed off though - thats what we do and the 9other kids aren't fussed about it.
I want to 'grab' them with the objectives, rather than do what every other teacher at school does - how much focus on differntiating the objectives do you make ? What about getting the kids to set the objectives themselves ?

We are also a 'healthy school, so the sweet idea is , sadly!! Damn those healthy schools

I am looking for way of setting them that adds a bit of mystery and excitment - :o :o



#5 DaveStacey

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 09:27 AM

Are you talking about the way you phrase them?

Can you turn them into enquiry questions - so if you were studying the Becket murder for example your objective wouldn't be 'To find out why Thomas Becket was murdered' but simply 'Why was the King Whipped?' following on from a picture starter of Henry being whipped in front of Becket's shrine?

It certainly captures the imagination, although perhaps doesn't work in quite the same way in terms of breaking the lesson down.

For what's worth, I know many people who get students to write the learning objectives down at the start of the lesson, and I've heard lots of reasons why, but personally I've never considered it more than an enormous waste of time.
:tomatoes:

#6 Maggie Smith

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 10:50 AM

Totally agree about writing objectives down - I know colleagues that do this, yet it takes up time and is not a very welcoming :zz: activity, I feel

The question idea is what I am interested in

Do people use phrases like All will...........Some will............A few will..........
or
WILF ......What I'm looking for

#7 Sarah S

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 04:46 PM

We're supposed to have lesson objectives for every lesson in the books - sometimes we only have the L/O and plenary if it's been an active lesson!

I generally use one objective, "to understand why..." etc, but then break the outcomes into
You will do well if you....
You will do very well if you....
You will do extremely well if you....

instead of All/Most/Some - it seems to work well for me.

#8 Lesley Ann

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 05:16 PM

whole school policy of lesson outcomes All, Most, Some
Carpe Diem - Seize the Day

#9 Karen P

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 07:57 PM

We are looking into making our lesson objectives link to the level the pupil can then get if they achieve it, does anyone else do this or think it is possible. Any ideas welcome. thanks

#10 Chouan

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 08:41 AM

Ours are:
We are doing ...... (skill, based on Bloom's)
We are looking at ..... (context)

#11 Dave Turner

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 04:04 PM

I sometimes get students to write their own lesson objectives after a starter/intro to see how close they are to the ones I have

#12 WilliamsonK

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 08:47 PM

I do a lesson question which everyone writes down - 'was the fire of london great?' etc, then I do a simple LO "to use sources to form my own view on the fire..." generally these get copied as its basically 2 sentences.
Then I go through the learning outcomes using
Good
Better
Best
I like phrasing it in a positive way and it gives pupils a clear target to hit - who doesn't want to be best!?


#13 WilliamsonK

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 08:49 PM

We are looking into making our lesson objectives link to the level the pupil can then get if they achieve it, does anyone else do this or think it is possible. Any ideas welcome. thanks


Yeah ours are levelled linked - good being a l4, better being a l5, and best being a l6 - although this is changable for the class, so with my vertical special needs class I still use good, better, best but obviously with a different ranking scale - but it gives opportunity for differentiation and different scales!

#14 Sally Thorne

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 10:27 PM

I've started having a learning objective for everybody, and then success criteria based on the levels, according to whole-school policy from this year. But instead of having the levels, I've started labelling them bronze, silver and gold. Everybody wants to go for gold! - whereas "Level 6" might be a bit offputting for lower ability and to a teenager trying to fit in, differentiating yourself from the herd by being "Some" is hardly ideal.

Here's an example from a lesson I did entitled "What did Gandhi think of the British Empire?" for year 8 -

Learning Objective:
I can answer the lesson question and am prepared to use that answer when we complete the unit assessment.
Success Criteria:
Bronze: I can describe who Gandhi was and what he thought of the British Empire
Silver: I can explain how Gandhi felt about the Empire and why he felt that way
Gold: I can explain how and why Gandhi's opinion might differ from a British diplomat's


I don't ever make them write them down, either, or stick them in. I feel quite strongly that this is A Bad Thing. But, I have the box with this info in on all my slides and refer back to it lots.

#15 Tony Fox

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 11:44 AM

I've started labelling them bronze, silver and gold. Everybody wants to go for gold! Here's an example from a lesson I did entitled "What did Gandhi think of the British Empire?" for year 8 -

Learning Objective:
I can answer the lesson question and am prepared to use that answer when we complete the unit assessment.
Success Criteria:
Bronze: I can describe who Gandhi was and what he thought of the British Empire
Silver: I can explain how Gandhi felt about the Empire and why he felt that way
Gold: I can explain how and why Gandhi's opinion might differ from a British diplomat's


I don't ever make them write them down, either, or stick them in. I feel quite strongly that this is A Bad Thing. But, I have the box with this info in on all my slides and refer back to it lots.


Simply wonderful Sally, this, I feel hits the intention of setting the learning objectives, in a few lines you have done more than a team of 'advisers' - many thanks

Edited by Tony Fox, 12 May 2011 - 12:25 PM.

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