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National Assessment


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#1 John Simkin

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Posted 31 October 2003 - 09:57 AM

Dr. Joanna Le Metais at the National Foundation of Research has just published an international report on national methods of assessment. It appears that only five countries have compulsory standardised assessment tests (England, Australia, Canada, Singapore, Wales – under review). Only the UK employs league tables to present this information to the public.

Countries such as New Zealand, Japan, Korea, USA, Spain and France use a sampling system in which a representative group of youngsters – usually around 3% are externally assessed. However, the vast majority rely on teacher assessment.

http://www.nfer.ac.uk/

http://www.nfer.ac.u...p.asp?theID=EIR

Like the recent OCED survey of educational performance the NFR points out that there is no link at all between national testing and educational performance. Dr. Joanna Le Metais, as the OCED report, likes what is happening in Finland. She points out that “Finnish schools are expected to evaluate the needs of their children and evaluate themselves. Teachers in Finland are also highly qualified – they have to have masters degrees – which is a key factor in favour of success.”

#2 Dan Lyndon

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Posted 01 November 2003 - 06:47 PM

I think that these are interesting comparisons John. I am always wary about over assessing my students, whilst at the same time accepting the positive elements of a skills driven curriculum. At my school we are very keen on using 'critical steps' to help students understand how to make progress in these skill areas and clearly this has to involve assessment. I know that you are not necessarily advocating the end of all assessment, but I think that one of the big issues we are facing is how to allow the KS4 curriculum to be loosened to allow teachers to be able to do the same kind of excellent things that are happening at KS3. I can't comment on AS and A2s as I haven't taught them but I know that there is even less time available due to the heavy assessment schedule.
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#3 Dan Lyndon

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Posted 01 November 2003 - 06:48 PM

I think that these are interesting comparisons John. I am always wary about over assessing my students, whilst at the same time accepting the positive elements of a skills driven curriculum. At my school we are very keen on using 'critical steps' to help students understand how to make progress in these skill areas and clearly this has to involve assessment. I know that you are not necessarily advocating the end of all assessment, but I think that one of the big issues we are facing is how to allow the KS4 curriculum to be loosened to allow teachers to be able to do the same kind of excellent things that are happening at KS3. I can't comment on AS and A2s as I haven't taught them but I know that there is even less time available due to the heavy assessment schedule.
Until the lion has a historian of his own, the tale of the hunt will always glorify the hunter.
comptonhistory.com
blackhistory4schools.com




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