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Differentiating Tudors and Stuarts


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#1 Seb Phillips

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Posted 14 October 2005 - 11:47 AM

Hi,

I have a real problem at the moment - I've got a mixed ability Year 8 group, and I mean MIXED. It goes from one kid on the Gifted and Talented program to students with Dyslexia, Aspergers and Tourrets syndrome. I have a really good relationship with the group and they worked well for me in Year 7, we always have at least one LSA with us, often two (three is not unknown if the kids are going through a difficult phase!) but they are finding it really hard to access the Tudors and Stuarts. I do a lot of roleplay, kinaesthetic and visual stuff, but for the least able, even that is difficult. On the other hand, some of the brightest students are obviously loosing interest because so much time gets spent dealing with the antics of the less able.

Has anyone got any advice? I really need activities which will stretch the top range and give the least able some chance to stay involved with the lesson. I'm a fanatical believer in mixed groups rather than streamed groups, and I need to find ways of getting them all to contribute to

One thing I'm toying with is splitting the group slightly and getting them to work on a more project based approach, with the work aimed at their individual level and lessons used to support that work. Seems like a massive amount of effort though.

Any ideas?

#2 MrsB

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Posted 14 October 2005 - 03:42 PM

just a question first,

why do you think they are having more problems accessing the Tudors and Stuarts than the courses last year?
It's only a job!

#3 DaveStacey

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Posted 14 October 2005 - 04:40 PM

Get yourself a copy of Paul Ginnis's book, 'Teachers Toolkit'. The 3rd section (I think - my copy's at school) deals with various approaches to differientiation, task setting, and pupils taking an increasing responsibility for their own learning (something that might appeal to those from G&T).
Might take a bit of preparing, but one of the approaches in there might be just what you need.

I'll post more on Monday when I've looked through it again.

#4 Seb Phillips

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Posted 16 October 2005 - 05:14 PM

>why do you think they are having more problems accessing the Tudors and Stuarts than the courses last year?

Partially them, partially me.

Last year, we did loads of creative/kinaesthetic stuff, which they enjoyed. The scheme of work for Year 8 is a lot more sources and inference based, which is more difficult for the less able to access (but, in my opinion anyway, better history. More skills, less games). The subjects don't help - Henry VIII was OK, and we're happy with Blood Mary, but I can see their eyes sarting to glaze over as we get further on. They just seem to be left a bit cold by how Elizabeth used JP's to govern the people - the topic doesn't excite them in the same way that things like Gladiators and the Black Death did.

It's also true to say that there is now a much more visible split between the ability groups. The really capable students are now good historians, whereas the less able have improved a bit, but not at the same rate. This is true across all the subjects the class studies - in fact, I'm told that they enjoy history so the whole group tries, whereas their other classes are getting really bad, with the less able switched off and the more able getting frustrated by their dreadful behaviour - which makes it all the more important that I dfferentiate what they do in my class.

Also, I have to confess that I'm also less excited by these topics than I was by the Year 7 material. I try really hard to make it exciting, but it's just one of those areas that I don't get thrilled by. I try really hard to stop that rubbing off, but with the Civil War looming, I'm not sure how I'll cope...

Cheers,

#5 DAJ Belshaw

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Posted 16 October 2005 - 06:51 PM

Also, I have to confess that I'm also less excited by these topics than I was by the Year 7 material. I try really hard to make it exciting, but it's just one of those areas that I don't get thrilled by. I try really hard to stop that rubbing off, but with the Civil War looming, I'm not sure how I'll cope...

Ah... this is the key thing, isn't it? My advice would be to to either find some books which stimulate you (books with anecdotes, Horrible Histories, whatever) which will in turn have a knock-on effect on your pupils.

Other than that, get through the content and spend longer on the topics you enjoy. Everyone in my department knows I race through Dying For The Vote and spend most of my time with my Year 9 pupils studying World War I. Well it is options year... ;)

Doug :hehe:

#6 Dan Moorhouse

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Posted 16 October 2005 - 07:26 PM

have a look at thinkinghistory.co.uk if your pupils liked the kinaesthetic stuff last year. Ian Dawson specialises in the Tudor era so there's a favourably disproportionate number of activities for this part of the curriculum.

#7 Andrew Field

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Posted 16 October 2005 - 07:35 PM

Why not explore some ICT opportunities too - see what some fool has written: http://www.tes.co.uk...story_id=368848
http://www.schoolhis.../background.htm


Generate your own versions of my games, quizzes and eLearning activities: ContentGenerator.net




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