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Using A Variety Of Learning Styles In Teaching.


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#16 Dan Lyndon

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Posted 18 May 2003 - 01:52 PM

When I come to plan a lesson I have in my mind just one solid thing - the question for the lesson. That is my starting point. The information and content is there to be fitted around whatever activities I choose to use in that lesson. By being totally open minded about how to actually deliver the lesson, planning becomes an exciting process where the activities will drive the lesson, not the need to be wedded to forcing the subject contents on to the students.

I have recently spent some time redesigning the lesson plan proforma for the History department, after an HMI inspection and an LEA inspection which were very critical of generic proforma that the whole school was using. There was a conceptual problem with the way in which the lesson objectives and the learning outcomes were seemingly merged together and the section for the activities became a hopeless battle to match outcomes for every task. As a consequence I asked members of this forum to send me copies of the lesson plans that they used (thank you for those that contributed) and I used the exemplar material from the TLF strategy.This helped me to use the best practice for reworking what had become an ineffective tool. The new proforma has made a significant difference to the short term planning of myself and the rest of the department. Stephen's quote above represents the key focus for the lessons in my department (in theory at least!). The use of a key question or learning objective is vital to the success of the lesson, and it is imperative that the students are clear about what they are going to do in the lesson. Once this has been established the variety of activities, pace and learning styles being used enables the students to learn in the most effective way for themselves. The clarity that the effective lesson plan provides allows the teacher to spend more time on the exciting, creative activities that stimulate the students, creating a positive learning environment for both student and teacher.
Until the lion has a historian of his own, the tale of the hunt will always glorify the hunter.
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#17 Joanna C

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Posted 19 May 2003 - 12:19 PM

I would like to try getting my students to think about their own learning style (I can see that this is a good lesson in itself, although reading through the information afterwards might give some ideas about the balance of different teaching styles to be used throughout the course). Could someone please tell me where I can find the Howard Gardner model which several people have referred to. It sounds interesting. The online questionnaire recommended by Dan Moorhouse provided an interesting update on my own preferred learning styles, but is too complex and time-consuming for a whole class.

Thanks :flowers:

#18 Richard Drew

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Posted 19 May 2003 - 03:35 PM

I would like to try getting my students to think about their own learning style (I can see that this is a good lesson in itself, although reading through the information afterwards might give some ideas about the balance of different  teaching styles to be used throughout the course). Could someone please tell me where I can find the Howard Gardner model which several people have referred to. It sounds interesting. The online questionnaire recommended by Dan Moorhouse provided an interesting update on my own preferred learning styles, but is too complex and time-consuming for a whole class.

Thanks  :flowers:

there are links to several sites and tests on this thread:

Learning styles

hope one or more of these are useful
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#19 Joanna C

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Posted 19 May 2003 - 04:36 PM

Thanks very much for the thread ... I've been reading and downloading as fast as I can. I had the impression that someone had a MI worksheet type activity I could use with my learners, but I haven't yet found it. Any ideas? And how useful have people found the information generated? Or is the main value in the lesson itself (ie for students more than for the teacher)?

#20 Mary Beth Borden

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Posted 16 June 2003 - 12:45 PM

I have a suggestion for an interesting lesson on Learning Styles for Joanna C.
It is on a website USA, sorry, run by Laura Candler. She and her husband are big proponents of cooperative learning and they have implemented this approach in whole schools here. In any case, if you go to Google and enter Teaching Resources Candler, it will be the first entry to come up. When you enter the site, go to In the File Cabinet, once there go to Cooperative Learning and the lesson on Multiple Intelligences will come up. ( I'm sorry that I can't embed the direct link, I'm an aol user and this function doesn't seem to work, probably just me!) The lesson includes a self-questionnaire called 'How Many Ways Are You Smart'.

Edited by Mary Beth Borden, 16 June 2003 - 01:05 PM.


#21 Lesley Ann

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Posted 09 July 2003 - 04:34 PM

Found this interesting website:
HISTORY ALIVE
The TCI approach consists of a series of instructional practices that allows students with multiple intelligences to experience history.

Particularly liked this page with good ideas on:
sharing good practice
Carpe Diem - Seize the Day

#22 Richard Drew

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Posted 09 July 2003 - 08:10 PM

whenever i come across anyone who queries the idea of needing to account for different learning styles i always show them this cartoon:

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#23 Richard Drew

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Posted 10 July 2003 - 07:56 PM

has anyone been on the Critical Skills training programme? as well as being a brilliant and thoroughly engaging course that has massively improved my teaching already, they offer many solutions to covering multiple intelligences.

to offer just one:

when working on a challenge in a group the pupils have to produce a variety of angles to their presentation:

the group have to reach a common answer/agreement on their key points, then they could produce a written answer and a diagram to illustrate it or perhaps a oral presenation and a model etc. this allows different learners to access the learning in their preferred way.

it also provides opportunities for these pupils to develop their less preferred skills in a safe environment. if visual learners had to prepare the written answer and auditory learners had to construct the model, then they would be challenging their weaker areas - something that is vital, to avoid labelling pupils with one style and pigeonholing them into this style.
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